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SANDOVAL LAKE RESERVE
TAMBOPATA TOURS - MANU NATIONAL PARK - LODGE
SANDOVAL LAKE RESERVE
TAMBOPATA TOURS - MANU NATIONAL PARK - LODGE
SANDOVAL LAKE RESERVE
TAMBOPATA TOURS - MANU NATIONAL PARK - LODGE
SANDOVAL LAKE RESERVE
TAMBOPATA TOURS - MANU NATIONAL PARK - LODGE
SANDOVAL LAKE RESERVE
TAMBOPATA TOURS - MANU NATIONAL PARK - LODGE
SANDOVAL LAKE RESERVE
TAMBOPATA TOURS - MANU NATIONAL PARK - LODGE
SANDOVAL LAKE RESERVE
TAMBOPATA TOURS - MANU NATIONAL PARK - LODGE
SANDOVAL LAKE RESERVE
TAMBOPATA TOURS - MANU NATIONAL PARK - LODGE
SANDOVAL LAKE RESERVE
TAMBOPATA TOURS - MANU NATIONAL PARK - LODGE
SANDOVAL LAKE RESERVE
TAMBOPATA TOURS - MANU NATIONAL PARK - LODGE
SANDOVAL LAKE RESERVE
TAMBOPATA TOURS - MANU NATIONAL PARK - LODGE
SANDOVAL LAKE RESERVE
TAMBOPATA TOURS - MANU NATIONAL PARK - LODGE
SANDOVAL LAKE RESERVE
TAMBOPATA TOURS - MANU NATIONAL PARK - LODGE

Activities

Considered by many of our tourists as one of their favorite activities. Navigate the Madre de Dios river in your own inflatable boat with nothing but the sounds of the rainforest as your backdrop. Float down the river back to the lodge reflecting over the days activities as you watch the sun set over the river. Take this unique opportunity to spot the different wildlife along the rivers edge, bathing on the banks, flying across the river or even swimming from one bank to the other. Only take your paddles out to change direction and let the river do the rest.

Many animals hear you before you see them so this is a great opportunity to float right by a variety of wildlife virtually undetected or heard. The hardest part of this activity is wanting it to stop.

The community of indigenous people known as Esa Eja are an ethnic group belonging to either of two lines: the Tacana-speaking Arawak, who migrated from the west, and those of Pano origin, who come from the lower reaches of the Madera River.

In the past they maintained themselves, and still do in large part, by agriculture, hunting, and fishing, they went naked except for feather decorations on dance occasions, and lived in small communities subject to petty chiefs. They would wear as their principal garment a sleeveless shirt or chemise, keeping the head and feet bare.

Visit a native family of the Ese-Eja etnia. Learn about their ancestral customs while you make your own bow and arrow with the chief of the family.

Have a personal experience as the chief and his family introduces you into their culture showing you how their etnia lived in direct relationship with nature.?Finally, you can have one on one talk with them as they display their handcrafts.

“Don’t taunt the caiman until after you’ve crossed the creek.”. Begin your night with a short introduction talk about one of the rivers largest reptiles, the caiman. We will begin our activity along the rivers edge in a motorboat under the moonlight searching for dwarf caiman, black caiman and spectacle caiman as they lay along the rivers banks. Using flashlights and headlamps we will make our way up river in search for the red eyes of the caiman.

Sandoval lake is an “oxbow lake” formed generations ago by the shifting waters of the Madre de Dios River. Once a river changes course, a length of the river, usually in a horse-shoe shape, is left land-locked. Sandoval with its clear, calm waters has evolved into a mature lake environment attracting a myriad species of wildlife and flora. Sandoval is home to the endangered Giant Otter and a great number of plants and animals.

Home to many species of birds, and 4 of the Amazon Basin’s top predators the Jaguar, Giant Otter, Harpy Eagle and Black Caiman. Blue-and-gold and Red-bellied Macaws inhabit the flooded palm forest on the west end of Sandoval Lake. Brown Capuchin, Bolivian Squirrel, Red Howler, Saddle-backed Tamarin, and Night monkeys live in the forests surrounding the lake.

Have an early Breakfast before traveling by boat upriver for 45 minutes to the entrance of the Tambopata National Reserve and begin the trek to Lake Sandoval. Paddle in a rowboat around the pristine mirror like lake and enjoy the beautiful scenery with the opportunity to observe a variety of wildlife such as the endangered giant river otter, howler monkeys, macaws and black caiman. Take a snack by the waters edge before continuing around the lake. Finishing with a walk back to the river where we board our motorboat and return to the lodge.

The animal rescue centre occupies a lot of our time and you will come into contact with some truly amazing animals and help feed them, care for them and get involved with the maintenance that such a huge project entails.

The concept of releasing captive animals into a safe environment is a popular concept for conservationists worldwide and Taricaya was the first official centre of its kind in Peru. Laws did not exist for such centres in Peru and we pioneered the concept amidst an ongoing battle for rights to sanction the release of confiscated animals. Now we host many enclosures that allow animals to recover their health before release back into their natural habitat. Thus far we have released 24 species of mammal, 13 species of bird and 4 species of reptile back into the wild. With qualified staff and associated vets constantly monitoring the progress of our residents the future looks very bright for all our animals and those yet to come into our care. With 39 animals in the centre currently we continue to pioneer work in this field and have plans for captive breeding programs and the reintroduction of groups of certain species that have been hunted to extinction locally.

Pilot Farm Amazon: We are sympathetic to the daily problems that local farmers face. The majority of communities located around Puerto Maldonado are not farmers by tradition but primarily gold miners, rubber barons and Brazil nut collectors. Puerto Maldonado was a boom town as little as twenty years ago but the people that flocked to Madre de Dios are not farmers by tradition and as such suffer trying to make the meager plots of land awarded to them by the government rentable. The riches of the area soon dried up leaving the fortune-seekers high and dry without local knowledge and sufficient means to make them capable farmers. The concept of the pilot farm is to help the locals manage their land efficiently and hence reduce their impact on the surrounding forest. Hunting, fishing, timber extraction, charcoal burning and palm leaf collection are time-consuming and labour intensive activities, which they would gladly rescind given the opportunity. We are fortunate enough to be able to perform various experiments with crops and productivity that local farmers do not have the luxury of testing. We are now in a position whereby we have created a self-sufficient module for local families. However, there is a problem. Various international charities have tried to work in the area before with concepts designed to revolutionize the lifestyles of the local communities but having brought the locals around to their way of thinking the money has always dried up and the participants have been left high and dry. This has resulted, and justifiably so, in general mistrust of people trying to help. We are now in a position to help the locals without the need for an initial financial investment by the communities concerned. When people come to us for aid we know that they are receptive to our ideas and the passive approach we have adopted over recent years is finally proving productive. Our combination of livestock management, tropical flower cultivation for sale and crop cycling is finally reaching the surrounding communities and many communities benefit from an improved standard of living whilst impacting the forest around them less and less.

Pilot Farm Project Amazon: The concept of the pilot farm is to help the locals manage their land efficiently and hence reduce their impact on the surrounding forest. Hunting, fishing, timber extraction, charcoal burning and palm leaf collection are time-consuming and labour intensive activities which they would gladly rescind given the opportunity. We, at Taricaya, are fortunate enough to be able to perform various experiments with crops and productivity that local farmers do not have the luxury of testing. We are now in a position at Taricaya where we have created a self-sufficient module for local families. With this model established we have been helping local communities in the management of their land. The second phase is an agroforestry project designed to help farmers recover abandoned farm plots with timber and plants that will provide high income from lands already left fallow. The soil in such plots is infertile and cannot support high density crops such as maize, rice and bananas. However with careful management and natural fertilisers they can be turned into productive wood plantations or fruit farms.

Summary to Date Amazon  :Taricaya now has two plots of land where we work. The original farm plot which was started in 2004 is now being maintained and used as a base for the production of saplings for transplantation to other areas. The second is a newly acquired area that had been abandoned by its former owners and we are trying to make the land productive again to demonstrate that it is, indeed, possible. Whilst working with traditional crops we have also been working with tropical flowers, mostly from the Heliconia family, that are being produced and sold both locally and elsewhere in Peru.

 Methods Amazon:In Peru, and indeed most developing countries, monocultures are recognised as the standard farming technique. Huge areas of land are cleared for the planting of one major crop such as corn or rice. Not only does this require a lot of area but maintenance is high and the risk involved is great. Disease, drought or flooding can wipe out a farmers entire production and he is forced to start over, often without the financial means to do so. At Taricaya we have been working hard on polycultures whereby we plant many different crops in the same farm plot and so the farmer can produce more at less risk. For example, one can plant bananas and cocoa initially, these trees grow quickly and the shade can be used to plant coffee, chillis and pineapples. This is a very basic example but already the farmer has five cash crops in the same area producing at different times of year. This model is one we have worked hard on and have achieved not just with plants but also livestock (goats, chickens, sheep and even guinea pigs- a delicacy in Peru). Volunteers now help in the maintenance of the first pilot farm and help us work with the local communities when necessary. The second plot was an abandoned farm and we have begun work by trying to recover the land with bananas and corn (for the animals in the rescue centre, and us!). These crops will produce short term but simultaneously we have planted saplings of timber species of tree that will grow whilst we harvest the other crops. The idea is to demonstrate that reforestation is not independent of working the land and can be done in parallel until the trees are big and the other crops out-competed.

Future Plans   Amazon :We hope to confirm that the recovery of abandoned lands is both possible but also profitable to the owners. By making reforestation economically advantageous we hope to convince more people to become involved in our work, either independently or with our help. Education and project awareness are vital in communicating our success and whilst local television and radio shows have taken an interest already we hope to expand our
area of influence.

This new initiative at Taricaya is in its infancy but the long term goal of the project is to research the reproduction of several different species of butterfly and their potential commercialization as a viable source of income for local rainforest inhabitants thus reducing their impact on the forest and improving their standard of living at the same time. This idea of scientific research coupled with financial gains for local communities makes this project very exciting and the large enclosure is completed and the laboratory equipped.This new initiative at Taricaya is in its infancy but the long term goal of the project is to research the reproduction of several different species of butterfly and their potential commercialization as a viable source of income for local rainforest inhabitants thus reducing their impact on the forest and improving their standard of living at the same time. This idea of scientific research coupled with financial gains for local communities makes this project very exciting and the large enclosure is completed and the laboratory equipped.

The side-necked turtle (Podocnemsis unifilis) has suffered for decades due to the commercial value of its eggs. Locals can raise large amounts of money, relatively speaking, from the sale of their eggs in the markets of Peru. In Puerto Maldonado the problem is particularly severe and the local communities have relied on this income for several generations. At Taricaya we have liaised with the government authorities concerned and have permits for the annual monitoring of a huge island in the middle of the Madre de Dios River. We collect the eggs during the laying season (July-August) and transfer them to artificial beaches at Taricaya where we await the occlusion of the eggs in November/December. Then, we engrave the young turtles with a code on their shells as this means that future recapture will associate the individuals with our project at Taricaya. To date we have released over 10,000 baby turtles back into the river system.

ACTIVITIES NIGHT WALKS

“A tangled forest and the feeling of hidden eyes watching.” Life stops for nothing in the forest not even night. Take a walk with your guide and experience the jungle as it transform from day into night making way for nocturnal animals, insects, reptiles and birds especially adapted for the dark. Many of the jungles inhabitants only make their presence known at night in the Peruvian rainforest.

Hike along the trails under the gaze of owls and nocturnal birds perched above while you catch a glimpse of a scurrying mammal in your flashlight. An orchestra of frogs can be heard in the distance surrounded by thousands of insects. The jungle is an amazing place after dark its here that life begins at night.

Botanical Walks

The Amazonian rainforests have unparalleled biodiversity. One in ten known species in the world lives in the Amazon Rainforest. This makes up the largest collection of living plants and animal species in the world. The Tambopata region of the Amazon rainforest has been declared as one of the most biodiverse areas on the planet and nowhere else can you find over 600 species of birds, 100 species of reptiles and amphibians, over 100 species of mammals and the number of insects is extraordinary.

As amazing as the number of animal species is in the Peruvian rainforest, the number of plants in this region is just as incredible.

More than 20,000 species of plants exists here in this part of the Peruvian rainforest and many have still yet to be discovered.

These plants have evolved an incredible multitude of defenses to counteract the various insects that feed off them. Many plants have thorns, irritating hairs on their leaves, and oils for protection. Many have also developed chemicals that act as natural pesticides against insects, fungi, and other living things that can harm them.

In these forests, drugs like muscle relaxants, steroids, quinine and cancer drugs can be found. Yet there are still new drugs waiting to be discovered, Drugs for AIDS, cancer, diabetes, arthritis and Alzheimer’s. On your walk through the forest you will see medicinal plants such as úna de gato, para para, santa maria, tangarana and much more. It truly is natures pharmacy!

Canopy walk way  tambopata :“Another continent of life remains to be discovered, not upon the Earth, but one to two hundred feet above it, extending over thousands of square miles.” The majority of rainforest species, plants and animals, reside in its highest reaches, the canopy. As you walk along the forest floor and gaze above trees in excess of 30 meters you might catch a glimpse of something moving or hear the sounds that echo from above. Even with the best binoculars it’s hard to make out what life exists here.

canopy walk

Until now!

Take a tour along our 90 foot walkway untill you reach the highest tree platform in South America, 47 meters high in the crown of an ancient Lapuna tree, for a more intimate encounter with birds, monkeys and other life. Capture the view unavailable anywhere else in the rainforest as your guide scans for the famous Harpy Eagle, flying Macaws, perching Toucans and other wildlife that call the canopy their home.

Trips  sandoval lake   reserve and canopy waalk way  tambopata :Excursion to Sandoval Lake within the Tambopata National Reserve and Canopy Walk. (Alternatives available: Canopy and Anaconda Walk, Conception, Ese’Eja Experience, Native Community, Gamitana Creek or Tambopata). Relax and glide in a wooden canoe, across a mirror like oxbow lake that is home to the endangered giant river otter, as well as red howler monkeys, red bellied macaws, anacondas and sideneck turtles. Afterwards, enjoy lunch at the lodge. Consider a visit to the remarkable Canopy and Anaconda Walk. Ascending the first tower, 95 feet above the forest ground, you begin your encounter with the treetop realm. For more than a quarter of a mile, you will literally walk through the rainforest canopy on a suspension bridge network linking eight observation platforms. Dur ing this hour and a half expedition, be on the lookout for bright toucans, woodpeckers, trogons, monkeys and the three toed sloth. If you wish you may extend your excursion and appreciate the sunset from one of the towers. After your descent from the Canopy, experience the Anaconda Walk for about 30 minutes along the 640 feet wooden bridge over the Aguajales swamps. In this lush eco system, you may observe the various species o amphibians, birds, mammals and abundant flora. During this hour and a half expedition, be on the lookout for bright toucans, woodpeckers, trogons, monkeys and the three toed sloth. If you wish you may extend your excursion; this will let you photograph the deepening hues as the sunset approaches. After your descent from the Canopy, experience the Anaconda Walk along the 640 fee

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